Helikon-Tex Pakcell Set

In Review by Jawor | Leave a Comment

How to arrange things within the main compartment of a backpack? You could use foil bags for example. However, there are more comfortable and durable solutions – for example, the Helikon-Tex Pakcell Set.

The Helikon-Tex Pakcell Set features three pockets with the following dimensions:

  • 23 x 12 x 9 cm
  • 32 x 17 x 13.5 cm
  • 35 x 21 x 17 cm

The Helikon-Tex Pakcell pockets were made from a thin polyester with a weave which is a micro rip stop variation – durable enough to withstand storing (non-sharp) things within the backpack or the occasional unpacking in the outdoors. The inner side of fabric is covered with an extra coating, thanks to which the material doesn’t leak water so easily. It is hard to speak of waterproofness of the pockets, as both the zipper and the stitches have no protection at all.

Each Helikon-Tex Pakcell is opened with an inversely-sewed YKK zipper. Placing the zipper diagonally allows for an easy access to the content and the general ease of use. Opening each of the Pakcells requires way less effort than if the zipper ran on the sides of the pocket. Moreover, a diagonal opening allows for a larger opening than a zipper placed in the middle, parallel to the longest side.

Opening the Helikon-Tex Pakcell pockets is further simplified by additional pullers attached to each zipper.

Above the zipper, the producer placed a piece of Velcro enabling to mark the Helikon-Tex Pakcells with patches (with names, symbols, colours) allowing to identify the owner or content without opening the pockets.

On the back of the Pakcells two straps (~20mm) with buckles were sewed on allowing to compress the pockets and their content to save space in the backpack or to stabilize objects in a partially filled Helikon-Tex Pakcell. Due to the width of the buckles, the straps can be also used to attach the pockets to MOLLE modular panels within backpacks (due to the rather thin fabric attaching them outside is not recommended).

The compression straps are attached to the piece of webbing which runs along the Pakcell, additionally reinforcing the structure and making it so that even filled Pakcells retain a rectangular shape. On the narrower ends the belt has not been sewn in and the producer additionally enclosed it in a rubber tube, creating two comfortable grips.

Our thoughts on Helikon-Tex Pakcell Set

After over a half year of testing I can confidently say that the Helikon-Tex Pakcell Set is a well-thought and properly made solution for maintaining order within the main compartment of a backpack (however, for smaller things an organizer will do better). The main fabric does very well – it is light and durable enough, that my Pakcells don’t show any signs of use except for being a bit dirty.

The range of Helikon-Tex Pakcell sizes allows for picking them for specific situations and tasks. In my case, the smallest of the pockets was filled with a “rain set” (a jacket and membrane pants), and in the medium or large pockets I carried some spare clothes. A fully-packed Helikon-Tex Pakcell can also fill out an additional role – it can successfully replace a pillow.

The only thing I can really complain about is the limited number of colours – right now the Helikon-Tex Pakcells are available only in Adaptive Green and Camogrom variants. It would be good to see them at least in a black variant too.

Summary

The Helikon-Tex Pakcell Set is a set of pockets allowing to organize the contents of a backpack and securing them from a bit of water (should there be more water the contents of the Pakcells should be secured with additional bags). Simultaneously, the Pakcells do it in a very comfortable manner while adding only a bit of weight (~200g) to the rest of the carried gear.

 Pros:

+ Lightweight

+ Materials

+ Quality of craft

+ Ease of use

+ Easy compression

Cons:

– Only two colours available

 

 

 

 

We would like to thank Helikon-Tex for giving us a chance to test the Helikon-Tex Pakcell Set!

~Jawor

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About the Author

Jawor

Hikes since he learnt to walk. Happy to spend hours discussing jackets, backpacks and other gear. Caver, diver and a leader of the Gear Insider project.

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