Tasmanian Tiger TT Trooper Light Pack 35

In Review by JaworLeave a Comment

Tactical backpacks with a flap are rather rare, and on our website we have so far reviewed only one backpack like this – Wisport Silverfox. However, it is now time to review another backpack of this type – the TT Trooper Light Pack 35, which, depsite the high quality of workmanship and comfort typical for the Tasmanian Tiger products, could also use some minor design improvements.

Design

TT Trooper Light Pack 35 is made of the ‘T-Square Rip’ fabric, which is a variation of the nylon rip-stop. It is lighter and more flexible than your typical Cordura, but at the same time, as shown by long-term use, iti is also sufficiently durable. Inner side of the fabric is covered in a water resistant layer, which provides basic protection against the elements and precipitation.

Main compartment of the TT Trooper Light Pack 35 has (as suggested by the name) a volume of 35l, with the dimensions 59 x 32 x 17cm. Inside, on the back there is a fabric compartment with an elastic edge and a loop for attaching the hydration systems. Opening of the main compartment can be closed using a drawstring and a strap with a plastic buckle.

The backpack can be then closed using the main flap. A piece of elastic tape sewn in the flap’s edge ensures the whole opening closes nicely.

On top of the flap there is a small MOLLE panel and four paracord loops, which make it possible to attach additional poaches or other equipment.

Below, inside of the flap, there is a pocket which can be opened using a double YKK zippered covering three of its four sides. The pocket is spacious and all of your belongins should fit inside nicely. However, the width of the opening can be problematic, as it presents a risk of the pocket’s contents spilling out when it’s being opened. Inside of the pocket there is also a small hook, suitable for securing your keys or other similar items.

Next to the pocket there is a convenient handle made out of tightly sewn webbing.

The front and the sides of the backpack are covered with additional MOLLE webbing.

Sides of the backpack feature additional compression straps, slots for water bottles and flasks (with drainage holeS) and extra handles.

On one of the sides, there is also an exit for tubes of the hydration systems, covered with a small hypalon flap.

The bottom of the TT Trooper Light Pack was additionally reinforced with a layer of a thicker, stronger fabric.

The carrying system is, rather typically, made out of a foam layer covered with a soft mesh. However, thanks to a great design of all the elements, the backpack, even packed fully, is very comfortable to use and carry around.

The design of the shoulder straps is one of the key parts that make TT Trooper Light Pack 35 so comfortable. For example, it is possible to regulate them both at the top, and at the bottom.

The shoulder straps feature a typical D-ring and a chest strap.

On the back, at the bottom, there is an extra layer of T Square Rip fabric, which protect the pack from damage and dirt.

Below, there is a simple hip belt, which can be also detached.

Finally, it would be impossible not to mention a little extra add-on that comes together with TT Trooper Light Pack 35. The backpack includes a piece of bright orange fabric, which can be attached to the front with a set of drawstrings and hooks. As a result, you can greatly increase your visibility, eg. when walking on the side of a busy road.

Our thoughts

High comfort and great ergonomics are a recurring theme in our reviews of the Tasmanian Tiger backpacks. The same is true for TT Trooper Light Pack 35. Good design makes it simply incredibly comfortable, and as a result, even when it was overloaded I still felt comfortable walking with the pack, with no pain or discomfort.

The quality of workmanship is also top notch. T Square Rip is not the same as Cordura, but, at the same time, even after a long term use it still performs perfectly fine. Same can be said about the other components of the backpack, too – the seams are straight, there is no damage or loose threads.

The whole backpack is has a spacious and thought-out design. At the same time, due to it’s shape and the opening at the top being the only way to access the main compartment, you’ll likely struggle to take anything from the bottom of a full backpack. It isn’t really a flow, but rather a part of the design one should be simply aware of.

On the other hand, despite it’s many strengths, TT Trooper Light Pack 35 has some minor flaws. The main one is the length of the zipper opening the external pocket (on the flap). The zipper work very smoothly, and as it opens all the way around the pocket’s three sides it is very easy to (even accidentally) open the pocket too much, so that the contents spill around. Believe me, you wouldn’t want your odds and ends to spill while you’re on top of a windy mountain…

Another hickup is the design of side pockets. When the backpack is fully packed it can be at times difficult to also squeeze in any water bottle or canteens.

TT Trooper Light Pack 35 could also use an additional small pocket for the orange piece of fabric. As much as I love the idea, and I happily used in on multiple occassions, it simply would be great to have a good place to store the marker when it’s not in use.

Finally, I feel like I need to mention the weight. Despite the word ‘light’ in it’s name, and using a lighter ripstop fabric instead of Cordura, TT Trooper Light Pack 35 isn’t really ‘light’. It’s weighs 1kg, which feels like a rather typical weight for a backpack of this type – not particularly heavy, but also not exactly light.

Conclusions

Top notch materials, high quality of workmanship and simply great comfort and ergonomics. Once again, Tasmanian Tiger has provided a quality backpack. And even though TT Trooper Light Pack 35 isn’t 100% ideal and could use some minor design changes, the high comfort still makes up for any hickups!

Special thanks to the Polish distribution of the Tasmanian Tiger backpacks for giving us a chance to test the TT Trooper Light Pack 35.

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Jawor

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